Posts tagged ‘16 tenses’

6 ways To make E-mail Practice Easy And Fun

6 ways To make E-mail Practice Easy And Fun

1 Put email in its place

For many of us, the most productive hours of the day are in the morning.

But whenever you’re at your most productive, don’t let 6 ways To make E-mail Practice Easy And Fun email intrude. Keep

your most productive period of the day for your action items and projects.

Schedule email instead of allowing it to schedule you.

2 Streamline response

When asking for help or assigning tasks send your request only to those

directly involved—the one(s) with action items. When you include ancillary

recipients it won’t be clear who’s responsible for handling your request.

Keep others in the loop with a separate message, or simply forward the

original with “FYI”. 6 ways To make E-mail Practice Easy And Fun

3 Break the chain

Stop forwarding email chains. Instead, take a few minutes to summarize

what’s important from the previous exchange. Just be sure your summary

is accurate and includes the relevant level of detail. It will take more of your

time, but will be more than offset by time savings for your recipients and

your company.

4 Proof it

Once you hit the send button, your 6 ways To make E-mail Practice Easy And Fun email is “live”. Take a moment to read

your message and make any adjustments for clarity, brevity, grammar, and

spelling. With email, less is usually more—efficient and effective.

5 Can the spam

Even if you never open spam emails they waste your precious time. Every

moment it takes to scan and evaluate subject lines and senders takes time

away from something more important. Use your email application’s rules

And filters to send spam directly to the trash folder.

6 Do it now

Some messages are easier to deal with than others. But the best way to

keep your inbox under control is to deal with messages as you read them.

Whether you reply, delegate, or delete, try to deal with each one. You

probably can’t avoid deferring a few emails, but if you always try for closure

your inbox will stay much more manageable

  • Emailing race
    Students have to write emails to get as many positive responses from their classmates as they can before the end of the game 6 ways To make E-mail Practice Easy And Fun. The easiest way of organising this is to get students to email each other to arrange to meet. The person who has made the most new arrangements and written them in their diary when the game stops is the winner. You can play similar games with complaining and demanding compensation, or with making orders.

    • Emails pairwork spot the differences
      Take an email and rewrite a few sentences in it, e.g. replacing “Dear Sirs” with “Dear Sir or Madam”. Give the changed email to one student in each pair and the original email to the other student. They should read out their emails to each other line by line and underline the differences. As a class, go through the answers and discuss if there are any differences in meaning or if either version is better in some circumstances.
    • Emails pairwork spot the errors
      This is similar to Emails Pairwork Spot the Differences, but this time the teacher should take a single email and add different errors to the Student A and Student B versions of it. Students read their emails to each other, listen for the parts that are different and decide together which of the two versions is correct at each point. Go through the answers as a class and discuss why each part is wrong (spelling, grammar, formality etc).
    • Emails with clues to solve a mystery or logic puzzle
      Two of the most fun reading activities are reading clues to solve a murder mystery (e.g. Elementary My Dear Watson from Intermediate Communication Games, or something similar from Reading Games) and reading to work out the solutions to logic puzzles (available in the Reward Resource Packs and many other places, including on the internet). By rewriting one of these so that all the clues come as emails (e.g. “Dear Inspector Maigret. Sorry for writing to you out of the blue like this, but I wish to inform you that I heard footsteps going towards the study at 7 o’clock on the night of the murder…”), you can add a serious reading and writing topic to the games. 6 ways To make E-mail Practice Easy And Fun

 

 

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Grammar Tenses

Grammar Tenses

Tenses (short explanations)

Conditional Simple

Conditional Progressive

Conditional Perfect

Conditional Perfect Progressive

Past Perfect Progressive (Continuous)

Future Progressive (Continuous)

Future Perfect

Future Perfect Progressive (Continuous)

Grammar Tenses

Tenses (detailed explanations)

Past Perfect

Past Perfect – Diagram

Past Perfect – Form of affirmative, negative sentences, questions

Past Perfect – Short and long forms

Past Perfect – Signal words

Past Perfect – Spelling

Past Perfect – Special verbs

Past Perfect – Summary

Past Perfect – Use

Grammar Tenses

Past Progressive/Past Continuous

Past Progressive/Continuous – Diagram

Past Progressive/Continuous – Form of affirmative, negative sentences, questions

Past Progressive/Continuous – Short and long forms

Past Progressive/Continuous – Signal words

Past Progressive/Continuous – Spelling

Past Progressive/Continuous – Special verbs

Past Progressive/Continuous – Summary

Past Progressive/Continuous – Use

Grammar Tenses

Present Perfect

Present Perfect – Diagram

Present Perfect – Form of affirmative, negative sentences, questions

Present Perfect – Short and long forms

Present Perfect – Signal words

Present Perfect – Spelling

Present Perfect – Special verbs

Present Perfect – Summary

Present Perfect – Use

Grammar Tenses

Present Perfect Progressive/Present Perfect Continuous

Present Perfect Progressive – Diagram

Present Perfect Progressive – Form of affirmative, negative sentences, questions

Present Perfect Progressive – Short and long forms

Present Perfect Progressive – Signal words

Present Perfect Progressive – Spelling

Present Perfect Progressive – Special verbs

Present Perfect Progressive – Summary

Present Perfect Progressive – Use

Grammar tenses

Present Progressive/Present Continuous

Present Progressive/Continuous – Diagram

Present Progressive/Continuous – Form of affirmative, negative sentences, questions

Present Progressive/Continuous – Short and long forms

Present Progressive/Continuous – Signal words

Present Progressive/Continuous – Special verbs

Present Progressive/Continuous – Spelling

Present Progressive/Continuous – Summary

Present Progressive/Continuous – Use

Grammar tenses

Simple Past

Simple Past – Diagram

Simple Past – Form of affirmative, negative sentences, questions

Simple Past – Signal words

Simple Past – Irregular verbs/Special verbs

Simple Past – Spelling

Simple Past – Summary

Simple Past – Use

Grammar tenses

Simple Present

Simple Present – Diagram

Simple Present – Form of affirmative, negative sentences and questions

Simple Present – Short and long forms (Contracted forms)

Simple Present – Signal words

Simple Present – Special verbs

Simple Present – Spelling

Simple Present – Summary

Simple Present – Use

going to-future

going to-future – Diagram

going to-future – Form of affirmative, negative sentences and questions

going to-future – Short and long forms (Contracted forms)

going to-future – Signal words

going to-future – Summary

going to-future – Use

Grammar Tenses

will-future

will-future – Diagram

will-future – Form of affirmative, negative sentences and questions

will-future – Short and long forms (Contracted forms)

will-future – Signal words

will-future – Summary

will-future – Use

Grammar Tenses

Tenses – contrasted

Future tenses

Past Perfect – Simple Past

Present Perfect – Simple Past

Present Perfect – Present Perfect Progressive/Continuous

Simple Present – Present Progressive/Continuous

Simple Past – Past Progressive/Continuous

Grammar Tenses

Various

English tenses (diagram)

English tenses (table)

English tenses – The verb be – Long and short forms

Most common English tenses (table)

Gerund or Progressive

Different terms for the English tenses

How a sentence can change its meaning.

How to put in tenses correctly.

Irregular verbs (table)

State verbs, dynamic verbs

The verb be – auxiliary and main verb

The verb do – auxiliary and main verb

The verb have – auxiliary and main verb

What are signal words?

Grammar Tenses